Resistance

Thanksgiving is over. For those that want to maintain weight or lose weight, those words come as a relief. No doubt the holidays are fun but for someone counting calories, Thanksgiving can bring chaos. The holiday is over; it’s a new day and new days are great for new beginnings. But…

One could say we are only midway through the eating season. It’s not yet December, which welcomes Christmas, another holiday people like to eat and another holiday that adds stress to those attempting to avoid bad foods.

Temptation is real and if it were easy to resist, things would be different. For some, temptation is dreadful. Food tastes good, you only live once, just for the holidays…. the excuses to eat are in abundance this time of year. Excuses are so thick, you can simply pluck them from the air.

But you don’t have to. You can resist. What, you say? Resist? It might be the hardest thing in the world for some of us to do… resist something that tastes good. Where’s the reward in resisting? If there were a reward that felt as good as eating delicious food, it might be easy to resist, right? Right.

So how do you do it? I don’t have any magic answers. I only know I feel more in control of my body and my actions when I’m exercising and trying to eat right. The two hold hands in my world. Let me explain… When I exercise (especially in the morning), I’m starting my day great. It helps me set my mind and my attitude to one of success because I’ve done the most physically difficult thing I’m going to do. From there, I feel as though I’m armed for the day. I’ve worked out and I don’t want to blow it. If I eat that piece of pie that might be 350 calories, I’ve completely negated my workout. Looking at things from this perspective helps me stay on track.

What I’m telling you is that, for me, exercise is oil that keeps the gears of my weight loss routine running smoothly. I can say no to a slice of cake if I know it costs 27 minutes with Jillian. That stuff is hard and it’s just not worth it. Exercise is much more difficult than eating. Period. Think about it that way for a while and you might actually restructure your thought processes toward food. And it might be worth it.

Or, I could be totally off. Let me know what your thoughts.

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The Value of Small Victories

It’s nice to have a long-term goal and it’s even better to have short-term goals to make the journey that much more enjoyable. In between those short-term goals are small victories that are worth recognizing because they represent the changes taking place.

For instance, at some point in your exercise regimen, you will realize certain moves are easier. You will find that instead of just trying to make it to the end of your workout, you actually try to do one more push up than you did yesterday. You’ll realize that you can go deeper into a lunge and you actually want to squeeze out one more squat in perfect form.

If you stick with a routine long enough, this does happen and it is the very reason you should stick with a routine. Why? Because it’s magic. This feeling of accomplishment, even if it is improving your form, is proving that the process does work and it’s giving you a reason to workout tomorrow.

Your journey will be filled with non-scale-victories and you should celebrate them just as you celebrate any other success. Use them as motivation.

Do you have a small victory you’ve experienced recently?

Share it with pride! 🙂

The Number One Reason Why You Should Work Out

If you’re working on losing fat, staying fit or giving yourself a tummy tuck the old fashioned way, you might struggle with motivation. Motivation can be hard to muster before work when you’re still groggy or after work when you’re tired and this might make you put off exercising for one more day.

Here’s why you should never do that:

Because the difficult thing to do is also the most rewarding.

Most days, working out is the most challenging thing I do. I get up early, I push myself through it and I tell myself it will be worth it. And you know what? It is. There is never a workout I regret – the only workout I regret is the one I didn’t do.

Don’t give yourself time to talk yourself out of doing it.

Reshape your thinking and know the reward is in the effort.

Progress

One of the most amazing things about the human body is its ability to adapt. The first few days of any new kind of exercise will leave yo feeling sore and defeated but, if you persist, you’ll find with every day, some progress.

The 30-day Shred is difficult for many reasons. It’s a lot of getting up and down and, if you’re not used to that, it can be really hard. If you have a belly, it might get in the way of getting on the floor and back up again. However, if you continue to pursue, you’ll find that after about the first week, things begin to change.

The first few days of any new regimen is simply surviving. You may feel like you’re getting your butt kicked and the best you can do is go through the motions. It is tough, no doubt. The following days might be filled with dread but you will notice small changes that bring encouragement.

For example, you may notice that you can lift your feet higher on butt-kicks or that you can do 30 seconds of jumping jacks without stopping to breathe. You might also notice that you can get down on the floor a little bit quicker and you can get up without as much effort. You might also notice you aren’t breathing as heavy as you were a week ago.

It’s all part of the process and, if you follow through, change will come – maybe even quicker than you think… the trick do staying committed during the early stages of any exercise routine is noticing how your body adapts in the smallest of ways. Give yourself kudos when you can do one more push up or a few more lunges – these small changes are significant because it’s your body telling you, “I can do this!”

Believe it.